Posted on

How to Wear Tech That Will Stop The Attack

How to Wear Tech That Will Stop The Attack

I was reading a story on the danger of running while female and I read a quote  that made me angry. It was as follows:

“I was running when I came up on a couple of dude-bros working out on the lawn near the path, flipping tires and such. as I ran by , one yelled, ‘Hey, I can show you a real workout’ and pointed down. I thought he was pointing at the tire, but then I realized he was pointing at his crotch.”—Amber Carr, Michigan-[1]

As a man who has known a rape survivor I was particularly  upset by the behavior of such jerks. No matter what psychology books you have read or what movie you have seen, nothing can prepare you for the shattered, heart breaking, flinching, look of a friend who has suffered a sexual assault.

Tips on learning to stop the attack
Learning to stop the attack

It’s a confusing time even as the healing takes place. Your instinct  is to comfort but you wonder if  holding her will only bring back the memory of that “cold cruel hand” on her flesh. You are reluctant to give her too much distance because you don’t want to make her feel that even a bit of you thinks it was her felt.

I guess one of the reasons that  I write about  running safety, is to bring awareness not only to women but also to the men in their lives about what  can be done to lessen the danger of running while female. Those who have read my posts know that I have written about safety lights and reflective vests.

The concern of those posts, though,  was to allow a person to understand how they can   “see and be seen”. The main mission was to ensure that the runner doesn’t get hit by a car. I was glad to have provided this needed information. However, now I want to go to the next step. I want to address what happens if the problem isn’t avoiding a speeding car, but fending off an attacker.

Is there  a technology that will inform a third party that an attack is taking place in real time?

I’m here to report that such groundbreaking technology is finally here.

Sticker on underwear sends distress signals to STOP sexual assault

Scientists  from Massachusetts Institute of Technology(MIT) have created a sticker capable of sending distress signals to stop a sexual assault.  The device called Intrepid by its creator Manisha Mohan allows a user to wear on their person. It comes in the form of a sticker which pairs with an app for the user’s smartphone that can alert up to five contacts should it be triggered.

How Does It Get Triggered?

According to an article in ubergizmo.com, “It detects how your clothes are being taken off, so when it detects that maybe it is being removed awkwardly (like if you were passed out and someone is trying to take advantage of you) or forcibly, it will activate and send messages to your emergency contacts unless you were to confirm that everything is in fact okay.” [2]

According to Intrepid: The proposed solution operates in two modes, an active mode for instances when the victim is unconscious or cannot fight against the assaulter, and the passive mode where the victim can activate actuate the device.

“Both modes release distress signals to prevent an assault in real-time, also alert the victim’s friends and family, and call emergency services for help.” [3]

How We Got Here

This is an amazing wearable technology that I’m talking about. “The wearable technology could put an end to the “disease” that is sexual assault, according to its creators.” [4]

I think it’s worth asking what steps or prior body of knowledge made this technology possible.

Imagine Reading This Headline:

Underwear alerts incontinence sufferers to urinary pad leaks: an electronic unit vibrates when wetness sensor threads detect urine overspills.

I know the subject may be a bit uneasy but perhaps you are beginning  to see how we can leap from electronic units that can detect urine overspills to a sticker  that can send distress signals.

Let’s go back  to see how the type of thinking on stopping the embarrassment of urine leaks evolved into stopping sexual assaults.

It all started at Barcelon. Medical reporter Jill Stein of Renal & Urology News broke a story about a product known as Smart Underwear which was designed  to alert patients to potential urinary pad leaks. The results of how effective this new wearable technology were released at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the International Continence Society. [5].

Among the findings were that  the smart underwear “ was effective at signaling patients to pad leakage events 87% of the time. In addition, 85% of patients were alerted in time to change their pad before leakage to outside clothing or furnishings.” [6].

How The Smart Underwear Worked

According to the inventors of the product, “The product consists of wetness sensor threads sewn into a pair of underwear and detects overspills of urine from the pad. An electronic unit is attached to the underwear and responds to an overspill by vibrating three times when wet, thereby signaling the wearer that the pad has leaked.” [7].

Time to Make The Connection

Understanding how wearable technology  leap from detecting a changing environment to detecting  when someone else is taking off your clothes.

As stated  before, researchers from the MIT have created ‘smart stickers’ that can sense when a person is being sexually assaulted.

The invention, produced by firm Intrepid, is attached to a piece of clothing and is connected to the users phone via bluetooth.

“If the stickers senses another person is removing items of clothing and a person is being sexually assaulted it sends a distress signal.”[8]

This is How The Process, Step by Step, Looks Like

To use the device, the wearer needs to download an accompanying app on their phone, and enter five contacts who will be called or sent a text in any case of emergency. As the device senses clothes being forcibly removed, it tells the phone, which sends a distress signal to emergency services and one in five contacts in the wearer’s phonebook are sent a text to alert them of the situation.

Tips on Keeping Yourself  Safe
Keeping Yourself Safe

Sticker on Underwear Sends Distress Signals to Stop Sexual Assault

As it senses clothes being forcibly removed, it tells the phone, which sends a distress signal to emergency services and one in five contacts in the wearer’s phonebook are sent a text to alert them of the situation.

 

The Hard Road to Healing

Is still important to understand that the struggle to heal after a sexual assault can be difficult.

 


Conclusion

Whistles, panic buttons, pepper spray devices, and smart phones have have  always been available for women to fend of attackers. The problem, of course, is that the devices had to be accessed in order to be activated. This is something that wasn’t always possible. The invention of the Intrepid dramatically gives power back to the woman in exercising her right to live and work where she chooses. With that said, here are parting thoughts.

 

Isolation is the worst thing that can happen to victims of trauma. It is vital if one feels broken to know that he or she is not alone in the journey to becoming whole again.

 

I think a big part of healing is to not allow yourself to be defined by what happened to you.

 

Healing take time. Yes, it often  takes one day at a time.

If You Like This Website Click Here To Create Your Own Website For Free

https://healthybacksupport.com/shop

 

I like to hear from the readers so please leave me a comment below to let me know if this post helped you or if you have any questions.

References

1.https://www.runnersworld.com/running-while-female

2.https://qz.com/1030952/an-mit-scientist-invented-a-sticker-that-can-detect-sexual-assault/

3.http://www.express.co.uk/news/science/832954/sexual-assault-prevent-MIT-technology

4.ibid

5. Stein, Jill. “Underwear alerts incontinence sufferers to urinary pad leaks: an electronic unit vibrates when wetness sensor threads detect urine overspills.” Renal & Urology News, Oct. 2013, p. S12.

6. ibid

7.ibid

8.http://www.express.co.uk/news/science/832954/sexual-assault-prevent-MIT-technology

8 thoughts on “How to Wear Tech That Will Stop The Attack

  1. Wow! This tech is one of the best that I’ve seen with regards to stopping rape and sexual assault. As a man, I’ve never been afraid of being sexually assaulted but hearing this kind of news everyday just breaks my heart. I hope this tech can be mass produced so that all women can utilize it. Btw, does it send the current location to the recipients too?

    1. Hi isaac,

      I am always on the look out for new technology in health and safety. I too was particularly impressed by Intrepid technology. I think  the fact that they were able to create a sticker capable of sending distress signals to stop a sexual assault is an amazing achievement. I don’t know if it sends current location to the recipients, but I’m sure that’s one of the questions the creator is working  out as she fine tunes the technology.

  2. Wow,

    To be honest I did no hear about this one!

    This is great thing to protect females getting assaulted.
    You see, who could tell 10 years ago that the technology will go this way?

    I will now go back to your site in order to read again the whole article, so I can learn more about this topic.

    Once again, I have to tell that I’m very glad that I found this article!

    All the best,

    Nenad

    1. Hi Nenad,

      Yes, I too am impressed by this latest wearable technology designed to protect women from sexual assaulted. I look  forward to us having a deeper conversation after as you said read again the whole article.

  3. When I read the title of your post I was intrigued, but I was hoping it wasn’t going to be a profile of one those really insulting and dumb ideas like “the rape proof underwear”. I was glad to find out your post was just the opposite, informative and told with care and sensitivity. Sticker on underwear sends distress signals to STOP sexual assault–Like I said, this could have been a really tacky post but it turned out to be a timely and informative post on the topic of sexual assault prevention. Very well handled and presented.

    1. Hey Allison,

      I know what you mean about the so called rape proof underwear. I too shook my head the first time I read about it. It was, to use your word, tacky. I know women who were victims of rape, and it was important to me that my post was not only informative but also dignified. If this technology can prevent or reduce the number of sexual assaults, that can only be to the good. I am happy to play my part in letting more women know about this important break through that can keep help keep them safe.

  4. Having been a victim of this menace, I can accurately tell how much pain comes with it. it is just too unquantifiable.
    I strongly believe this is a breakthrough in technology to help to-be victims of rape.
    I will love to share this with a couple of friends, however, I hope this wearable is readily available and I have been kind of ske[tical about how the distress contact will identify the scene of the crime and quickly come to a rescue.
    Hope it won’t be a case of ‘medicine after death’?

    1. Hi Roberta,
      First, the part that you can talk about your experience, even a little, hopefully means that you got the support that you needed to deal with your ordeal. As for your question, to use the device, the wearer needs to download an accompanying app on their phone, and enter five contacts who will be called or sent a text in any case of emergency. As the device senses clothes being forcibly removed, it tells the phone, which sends a distress signal to emergency services and one in five contacts in the wearer’s phonebook are sent a text to alert them of the situation. I think that this means the chances dramatically go up that the attack may interrupted by police close enough to help. However, I do take your point that making the technology work may be difficult at first. There may be issues that have to be ironed out. That said, I think this is a positive development in the area of rape prevention.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *