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How to Save on Hardwood Renovation and be Healthy

How to Save on Hardwood Renovation and Be Healthy

How to save on hardwood renovation and be healthy may seem like an usual topic for someone who blogs about back pain tips and solutions.  After all, hardwood floor doesn’t give and thus will only worsen back pain, right?

Wall-to-wall carpeting complements the decor of a home or business, feels great underfoot, warms a room, and provides a sense of security where young children crawl and play.

You may ask what’s not to love? However, there is more to carpeting than meets the eye. The dangers hide in what we cannot see.

  

Dyes, stain guards, moth-proofing, dust mites, heavy metals, pesticides, molds, toxic chemicals in the carpeting, padding and adhesives, …collect in carpeting, and all add up to a veritable stew of contaminants. They are not removed by vacuuming — and shampooing can sometimes worsen conditions. [1]

That Fancy Vacuum Cleaner May Not Make Your House Poison Proof

Improved air quality–many studies suggest that carpet retains dust particles, unlike hard surfaces where they regularly become airborne. However, some in the carpet industry say If carpets are regularly vacuumed, these dust particles and associated allergens are removed

Here is a scary thought.

“Vacuum cleaners can sometimes do more harm than good because most residential models have inefficient filters which allow very fine dust particles to blow back into a room, posing serious problems for asthmatics and allergy-prone individuals. Even with more efficient units some gases that are not highly volatile and normally cling to carpeting can become airborne during vacuuming.”[2]

Here is What Can Happen If You Shampoo Your Carpet

“Shampooing rugs often creates a damp environment fostering mold growth, mildew and dust mites, which proliferate in high humidity environments. Professional rug cleaners sometimes add insecticides and fungicides to the process, and some shampoos contain formaldehyde in addition to a host of other toxic compounds.” [3]

For years I had floor to floor carpeting for my house, but I replaced it with hardwood flooring because the carpet kept making my elderly mother, 88, sick. As soon as I got rid of the carpet, her breathing problems came to a stop. She didn’t notice any greater pain from walking on the hardwood floor. Every situation is different, of course, but for my mom removing the carpet did her a lot of good. While many people might not necessarily take into account the state of their health when picking out flooring, it’s within reason to include it as a potential factor, especially if you are susceptible to allergens or pathogens of some sort. That said, hardwood flooring can be a lot more expansive than carpeting.

Great Flooring to Fit Your Budget

Most people love hardwood flooring. It’s easy to clean and it won’t trap dust the way a carpet can. I recently replaced my dingy rug with a gleaming Red oak hardwood floor.

   

After getting price estimates and comparing order samples, I decided to use the neighborhood store. The installation didn’t break my budget. Perhaps you are thinking about replacing  your carpet with a hardwood floor.

Here are 5 Tips That Can Save You Money

  1. Know What’s Under The rug

Do you know if the subfloor is concrete or plywood?

it’s important to be sure. Most hardwood flooring is installed in horizontal planks. They’re assembled in layers that click together, and then nailed in to keep them intact. A concrete floor may cost more because it has to be glued on with a special adhesive.

The Floating Style

Hardwood flooring can float—meaning it’s not nailed in. While this may sound cheaper, that may not be the case. You have to consider the cost of having an under bed, material needed to cushion the flooring, that goes with the float type of installation. Know what’s under the rug and you’ll save yourself some bucks from the get go.

2. Know Your Space

You should know the exact square yards of each room. All you have to do is check out the original blue print of the house. If you have a base to work from, the estimator won’t go crazy adding square yards that you don’t need.

3. Make good use of your Space

Hardwood flooring can have a thickness of 3/4 a plank or less. I used the thicker planks for downstairs and the kitchen, the spaces with the most traffic. I used the thinner flooring upstairs, including closets. I saved a couple of hundred dollars.

Engineered HardWood

What if where you live the weather is freaky? It can mess with the  natural movement of real wood. You might want to consider engineered hardwood flooring. The planks will remain flat and stable regardless of crazy seasonal changes. This may save you money in the long run. Also, many homeowners simply enjoy the look of hardwood flooring. It can add a real elegance to the home. Also, a nice feature about engineered hardwood is that it can be used  in most rooms.

4. Keep The Molding

It isn’t necessary to get rid of your original molding unless you don’t mind spending $800.00 dollars or more. Most big outfits will try to convince you that the original molding won’t fit back on correctly. Stand your ground. You don’t need to have people rip apart your perfectly good molding just so they can charge you more money.

5. Try to Deal With The Local

Consider using a local flooring store. The contractor will have likely done a lot of work in your neighborhood. He or she will have people who can vouch for his or her work. The local contractor will also be aware of the rules and regulations concerning how to get rid of the carpet that’s now thrash. You’ll save yourself a big fine.

Conclusion

Well, I’m happy with my Red Oak hardwood floor. It’s easy to clean and mom doesn’t have coughing fits anymore from all the dust and bacteria that was trapped in the carpet. I didn’t bust my budget. You can do the same. How long are you going to put up with a carpet that’s making your loved one sick?   You have  received good tips on how you can get hardwood flooring that fits your budget. Go and get that gleaming hardwood flooring. It won’t only look good, but it will also make your house a lot healthier.

I like to hear from the readers so please leave me a comment below to let me know if this post helped you or if you have any questions.

References

(1.) Carpeting sad Children’s  Health, Washington Sbxics Coalition, fact sheet, Oct.2000.

(2.) Williams, Rose Marie. “Health Risks and Environmental Issues.” Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients, June 2001, p. 28.

(3.) Ibid

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