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How to Have an Awesome VLog That Stops Falls

How to Have an Awesome VLog That Stops Falls

The best advice I ever heard about blog writing was from phenomenal blogger Chris Brogan who said:

“Forget about finding  your voice. Find a solution to someone’s problem”.

Want to know more?

This is how he puts it. Imagine that you’re in the mood to buy Thai food.

Tips About VLog
A Plate of Thai Food

You go in and the service isn’t that great, maybe it even sucks.  But….

Tips About Vlog
Woman Enjoying Cup of Coffee

You may never go back to that restaurant, but you did get the Thai food  that you wanted. Problem solved.

Here’s Something to Think About:

You go to another  another restaurant. The customer  service  is first rate, the ambience is fantastic, and the place is clean enough  to make Chef Ramsay  proud. However..

Tips About VLog
Angry Woman Wants her Thai Food.

They don’t have Thai Food. No one there has a clue as to what Thai food is. No one has an answer to your problem.

This got me thinking about posts that I have written that have specific  information on how you can prevent an elderly parent from falling. So here is how to have an awesome vlog that stops falls.

Let’s jump in

Home Tech That Prevents Falling

Falls are a leading cause of injuries and injury-related deaths in people over 65 years of age [1]

This is why WiGait is a home tech that remains one of my favorite discoveries. Why?

It offers a solution to a very devastating problem—how to prevent an elderly parent  from falling when he or she is along in the house. This is a big relief if you are someone who is constantly worried about your mom,  dad, or  another older relative  taking a fall that they may not survive?

Here is The Deal:

Falls occur mostly in dynamic conditions [3]. This means in order to prevent someone from falling you need the ability to assess if there is instability  in their  gait and if that instability  puts them at risk of taking a life ending fall.

This is why  I was absolutely blown  away by the genius and compassion of WiGait.

Here is how WiGait works:

WiGait, a wall-mounted device is the size of a small painting,  measures  the walking speeds of multiple people. This means if mom or dad are constantly missing a step or steps when they move, that can be detected and fixed in time to stop a fall.

Want to Know The Best Part?

WiGait is designed to use about one-hundredth the amount of radiation of a typical smartphone. So if dad or mom is the kind that worries about all that radiation that we are getting from our technology, they can relax. And you will too.

Making Your House Fall Proof

Helping people transform unsafe spaces into healthy places for the elderly is one of my passions. After all, I am a caregiver for a mom who suffers from chronic back pain and has problem with balance. Making sure she feels safe is something that I constantly work at.

Unsafe physical environment may include poorly designed stairs, uneven ground, slippery surfaces, tripping hazards, lack of illumination, and absence of grab bars. That said,  many seniors need to overcome their  fear of falling. Fear of falling can cause them to stop doing and that can lead to stop living. We don’t want that for mom and dad. Thus, you should  make your home safer and that will lead to more confidence. More confidence means less fear.

 

Using Tai Chi to Prevent Falling

Yinong Chong, PhD, instructor at the Traditional Chinese Culture Institute International in Bethesda, Maryland, refers to Tai Chi as being “like a walking meditation”. [5]

Remember our discussion about WiGait above? We made the point that the elderly  can sometimes miss a step or two when walking and that  can result in a fall. Tai Chi helps prevent falls because as Dr. Chong explains: “you practice slowing down and balancing, so you don’t get ahead of yourself when you’re moving.” [6]. This results in no miss steps. This results in no falls.   So if your mom or dad needs to find a solution that slows their  steps and gives them a more fluid way to move that will ensure more stability in their gait, Tai Chi seems like a great option.

How Not to Land on Your Ass in The Bathroom

One of the things that my mom, a back pain sufferer, looks forward to everyday is taking a warm soothing bath. So I can easily believe that bathing is described by older adults as an important and meaningful activity. My mom always talks about  the pleasure and relaxation that she derives from bathing.

That said, one of the most common reasons for bathing disability is fear of getting stuck in the bath or slipping and getting into or leaving the bathing position. One great solution, in addition  to grab bars, is the bath seat.  What I liked about this mobility aid is that it eliminated the fear of going to use your own bathroom without someone helping you. In a word, it gave the elderly bathroom independence. I think that’s an amazing thing.

Become More Secure With a Security Pole

One of the questions that I get asked a lot about mobility aids is whether they are meant to support the entire weight of an individual  or  just meant meant to help achieve steadiness?

Some will support the entire weight of an individual but others like The Security Pole are not intended to carry the full weight of an individual. This product is only intended to provide balance and support while sitting and standing. Nevertheless, I feel this mobility  aid plays an important role in the mission of fall prevention.  It provides easy transfer from sitting position to standing, and that can  boost confidence and take away the fear of falling. I think that’s a very actionable solution.

Conclusion

I hope you enjoyed this vlog about preventing falls. Each video addressed a solution to the problem of elderly balance and risk of falling. You should now have a very comprehensive view on the topic and actionable solutions.

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References

1.

ReferencesWorld Health Organization [WHO]. Falls. 2016. Available from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs344/en/.

2.

Rubenstein LZ.  Falls in older people: epidemiology, risk factors and strategies for prevention. Age Ageing 2006;35: 37-41. doi: 10.1093/ageing/afj018

3.

McArthur C, Gonzalez DA, Roy E, Giangregorio L. What are the circumstances of falls and fractures in long-term care? Can J Aging 2016;35: 491-498. doi: 10.1017/S0714980816000556 27745566

4.

Feldman, Fabio, and Habib Chaudhury. “Falls and the physical environment: a review and a new multifactorial falls-risk conceptual framework.” Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 75, no. 2, 2008, p. 82+

5

“Try Tai Chi for better balance: the ancient Chinese art of Tai Chi (“tie-chee”) is an especially good way for older adults to exercise for cancer prevention and reduce the likelihood of falls. Two Tai Chi experts tell us how this gentler form of weight-bearing movement can help prevent injuries and improve quality of life”

American Institute for Cancer Research Newsletter. .111 (Spring 2011): p11.

6

Ibid

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How to Have Amazing Laughter Exercises That Empower The Elderly

How to Have Amazing Laughter Exercises That Empower The Elderly

Tips About Yoga Laughter Exercises
Yoga Laughter Exercise

Yes, Columbo

Tips About Yoga Laughter Exercises
Columbo is Thinking

 

Why Would They?

Tips About Yoga Laughter Exercises
Columbo Has it Figured

You got it. Here ’s The Deal:

Laughter Yoga For Seniors is an Example of How to Have Amazing laughter  Exercise to Empower Elderly

Developed by Madan Kataria, MD, a physician based in Bombay, India, laughter yoga is a fun new way to help participants destress while getting a workout. The whole concept of group laughter  exercise, according Kataria, is based on yogic breathing methods designed to produce unique physiological balances by connecting mind, body and spirit. [1] Dr. Kataria is also creator  of the Laughter Club—where, you guessed it, people engage in big laughs while exercising—funky chicken or hokey pokey anyone?

Tips on Yoga Laughter Exercises
Woman laughing

Seniors who have improved their  mental health, aerobic endurance, and confidence  in their ability to exercise do  3 things well:

First, they know how to stick to exercises.

Maintaining the motivation to adhere to regular physical activity is a challenge for many older adults.

Second, they know how to elevate their mood. “Laughter Yoga can change your mood within minutes by releasing endorphins. This makes you feel good and keeps you cheerful throughout the day.” [1]

Third, they have learned to expand their   comic vision, which  is the ability to perceive the humor around us. “Maintaining a comic vision retains a sense of control and keeps us from being overwhelmed by stressful events.” [2]

The rest of the post will expand on these ideas to show how  to have amazing laughter exercises that empower the elderly

But Here’s The Kicker:

Despite the health benefits of physical activity and the risks of physical inactivity, many adults don’t engage in sufficient physical activity to achieve health benefits.

As a friend of mine, a retired Rehab nurse points out, “I am one to also encourage the elderly to exercise. However, sometimes no matter what you do or say, some just will not do it. I do not stop promoting it though! I fully believe in how exercise can help the elderly.”  She goes to explain that she has “seen firsthand how exercise promotes independency especially after a trauma, stroke, joint replacement or brain injury. It is amazing.”

Here is The level of Exercise The Elderly Need to Keep Healthy

Adults should participate in a minimum of 30 minutes of physical activity at least five days a week to achieve desirable health outcomes, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services’ 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines. [3]

Here is The Bottom Line About The Type of Exercise Program The Elderly Will Stick to

Physical Activities programs that elicit positive emotions through simulated laughter have the potential to improve health, physical performance, and self-efficacy for PA among older adults and may positively influence participant adherence.

This is how it works:

The pleasant associations with laughter may add enjoyment to an  exercise program and keep older adults motivated to work out, the researchers noted, in the paper published in the journal The Gerontologist. [4]

Tips on Yoga Laughter Exercises
Curious Columbo

That’s not a problem, Columbo. Here is the scoop:

For six weeks, the participants in the study attended two 45-minute physical activity sessions per week that included eight to 10 laughter  exercise lasting 30 to 60 seconds each.

The result is that the participants  had a good time and finished the program.

Act As Though Things Really Are Funny is a way for Seniors to elevate their  moods.

Think about this:

The older we get, the more responsibilities we take on, the more stressful life becomes and the less we seem to laugh. Things we once thought were funny just aren’t anymore. Maden Kataria  puts it this way: “.. even pretending to be amused can brighten your day.”

He tells of an actress who played a very sad role for 10 years and started having different physical ailments, including depression. After ruling out any physical cause, her physicians determined that her acting role was contributing to her ill health.

They recommended that she quit the part and switch to comedy. Once she did, she noticed a gradual lessening of her symptoms! This case led to the Laughter Club’s basic philosophy, which is to “act happy.” In other words, fake it. Or as Kataria advises: “Fake it ’til you make it!” [6]

Expanding Your Comic Vision—Finding Humor All Around  You

Imagine the typical reaction of an elder person who trips and almost falls. At best he or she may be embarrassed, and at worst he or she may develop a fear of falling and avoid any physical activities. This may, and sometimes does, result in social isolation. Social isolation can lead to loneliness and that can lead to such conditions as back pain.

Then again, one can see himself as a modern Dick Van Dyke and have a good  laugh. This is what we mean by comic vision. As Carrie Myers Smith,an exercise physiologist and freelance writer, points out: “ It is common knowledge among humor professionals that children laugh approximately 400 times a day. Adults? Only 15 times! When I get stressed out, I sit back and watch my young sons. Sometimes, I don’t even have to be in the same room; I just sit and listen. Kids are such natural comedians!”

Tips on Yoga Laughter Exercises
A Childish Laugh

Think about when you were a kid. Remember how your parents just shook their  heads at the darnedest thing that tickled your funny bones? For example, moving like your  favorite animal. Older people who have expanded  their comic vision have the same ability as kids to find humor in almost anything.

For more information check: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laughter_yoga

 

Conclusion

As the Rolling Stones pointed out, getting old is a drag.  Most people find very little humor in getting older. They know they should exercise but it’s easier to just say the hell with it. Yoga Laughter exercise changes a person’s perception  of physical  activities from being a burden to something fun that can be shared with friends. Know any good jokes?

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I like to hear from the readers so please leave me a comment below to let me know if this post helped you or if you have any questions.

References

1

Laugh yourself fit. (Wellness) Carrie Myers Smith IDEA Health & Fitness Source. 20.3 (Mar. 2002): p 63+

2

“Laughter-based exercise may boost health in the elderly.” IANS, Sept. 2016

3

Witkin, Stanley L. “Taking humor seriously.” Social Work, vol. 44, no. 2. 1999, p. 101+

4

“Laughter-based exercise may boost health in the elderly.” IANS, Sept. 2016

5

Ibid

6

Laugh yourself fit. (Wellness) Carrie Myers Smith IDEA Health & Fitness Source. 20.3 (Mar. 2002): p 63+

7

Ibid

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How to Create Best Exercise Program For The Elderly

How to Create Best Exercise Program For The Elderly

Regular physical exercises seem to be one of most important habit for living a healthy and joyful life. Physical activity has both health promoting and disease prevention properties

Photo of Elderly Woman Exercising
Elderly Woman Trying Best Exercise

If you asked any doctor  if elderly patients should exercise, the consensus  is yes.

Exercise improves flexibility, mobility, and cardiovascular and respiratory function. It decreases body fat, increases muscle and skeletal mass, lowers pulse and blood pressure, improves lipid profiles, and serves as non pharmacologic therapy for constipation. [1]  How to create the best exercise program for the elderly is becoming  a bigger issue as more of the elderly want non-pharmaceutical measures to help them deal with the emotional effects and weakening body that comes with aging.

Exercise for The Elderly Replaces Medication

According to a report by Swedish National Institute  of Public Health, physical activity in the prevention and treatment of disease was completely comparable to those obtained from pharmaceutical treatment.

Also, “one advantage of physical activity as a treatment compared to medication is that physical activity makes patients feel actively involved in their own treatment and encourages them to take personal responsibility for their own health.” [2]

Adherence to Exercise For The Elderly

This report was borne out by a study that focused on the effects of an exercises regimen on the elderly. It found improved fitness and appearance, weight loss, increased energy and better eating habits realized through their exercise regimens motivated the participants to continue with an exercise program.

Exercise also improved some participants’ confidence, sleep patterns, depression, tension, ability to cope with stress, concentration, mood, alertness, appetite and stress level, leading them to continue exercising. [3]

For more information check https://www.physio-pedia.com/images/2/25/Swedish_Strategy.pdf

The Need to Find Best Exercise Program For The Elderly

When dealing with older people, however, sometimes special approaches  are required both for assessing their exercise needs and for guiding them into an appropriate exercise regimen. Some elderly people feel uneasy going to a gym, while others consider it a great opportunity  to socialize with fellow peers. Thus this question arises: What is the effectiveness of gym-based exercise versus home-based exercise with telephone follow-up amongst adults with chronic conditions who have completed a short-term exercise program supervised by a health professional?

Let’s jump in

The participants were recruited following a 6-week exercise program at a community health service. Intervention: One group of participants received a gym-based exercise program for 12 months (gym group). The other group received a home-based exercise program for 12 months with telephone follow-up for the first 10 weeks (home group) [4]

Gym-Based Exercise Program as Best Exercise Program For Elderly

Woman Exercising at The Gym
Woman Exercising at The Gym

The elderly participating in the gym-based  intervention were given a 12-month ,  exercise program that suited their  individual needs. The whole set up was supervised by a physiologist from the community health service from Monday to Friday for 2 hours per day. This meant that there was a person present at the gym with whom the participant already had a pre-established relationship from when they had completed the initial short-term supervised exercise program.

The prescribed exercise included strengthening, aerobic and stretching exercise components. The strengthening component involved 40 minutes of six to eight strength training exercises for the upper and lower body (eg, leg press, calf raise, bicep curl, triceps push-down, lateral pull-down, chest press or scapula retraction) using pin-loaded resistance equipment, unless contra- indicated. The aerobic compo- nent of the exercise involved up to 15 minutes of stationary bike, treadmill or cross trainer. [5]

Home-Based Program With Telephone Support as Best Exercise Program For Elderly

The participants  who used a home-based intervention were also given a 12-month exercise program focused on their individual needs.

This is how it worked. Mom or dad was encouraged to complete a 1-hour exercise session, three sessions per week, at home. They would be supervised via five telephone calls over the first 10 weeks, approximately 25 to 30 minutes in duration.

The five phone calls took the same amount of time to that spent supervising each participant in the gym over a 12-month intervention period. In a word, mom and dad didn’t get short-changed. There was also consistency. The same exercise physiologist who supervised the gym-based program did the same for the home-based program.

The exercise prescription aimed to be comparable to that of the gym-based program. It also adhered to the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for chronic health conditions, with strength, aerobic and stretching components comparable to the gym-based program. [6]

Some Things to Think About

Friendship Scale. This is a short and user- friendly instrument that measures six dimensions contributing to social isolation and social connection. A score between o and 24 is obtained; higher scores indicate less social  isolation. In short it measures loneliness and the ability to interact with others.

 

A Photo of People, Friends, Fists, Over Desk
People

For example, having to go to the gym forces people to leave their house, which has potential mental health benefits from experiencing new environments or being exposed to sunlight while traveling to the gym. Remember that sunlight helps with Vitamin D deficiency.

One would not be surprised than to learn that the gym-based group exercise may improve mental health outcomes slightly  more. Yet overall, there was no real measurable  differences of outcomes between the two approaches.

You may be wondering how that could be possible? Even if the physical  outcomes were the same, wouldn’t be lessening isolation by going to the gym be a better psychological out come?

The answer is a big yes if you only used a measure such as the Friendship Scale—meaning how many people is someone connecting with outside the house. However, one can look at something like the Lubben Social Network Scale LSNS-6 which measures social network size. The LSNS-6 is a validated instrument designed to gauge social isolation in older adults by measuring the number and frequency of social contacts with friends and family members and the perceived social support received from these sources. More and more seniors are connecting with their  friends and family through social networks. It’s likely that telephone conversations with the physiologist spurred them to report their progress to friends by telephone  or social  media as a way of getting a psychological  boost.

Women Social Network
Women Social Network

Conclusion

A final note, the gym-based exercise program was more costly compared with home-based exercise with telephone support. So if one is living on a fixed income but feels the need to stay healthy and fit, going to the gym is not the only option. This post examined  the feasibility  of the elderly participating  in a home-based exercise program with telephone support. It is not only possible and cheaper but in some cases a more practical  solution than going to the gym. It’s an example of how to create best exercise program for the elderly.

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I like to hear from the readers so please leave me a comment below to let me know if this post helped you or if you have any questions.

References

1

Ettinger, Walter H., Jr., et al. “Exercise for the elderly.” Patient Care, 15 Apr. 1989, P. 165+

2

“People Who stop Exercising Lose Long-Term Mood-Enhancing

Benefits.” Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week, 31 Mar. 2001, p. 10

3

https://www.physio-pedia.com/images/2/25/Swedish_Strategy.pdf

4

Ettinger, Walter H., Jr., et al. “Exercise for the elderly.” Patient Care, 15 Apr. 1989, P. 165+

5

Ibid

6

Ibid